Undergraduate Program

Overview

The undergraduate program in Classics offers a challenging and rewarding course of study in the unified field of Graeco-Roman culture. It is designed to accommodate both the aspirant to graduate studies in Classics or related fields and the student primarily interested in an undergraduate, liberal arts major. For more information regarding the advantages of a classics degree please see our About the Major section.

Emphases

The UCSB Classics major must select one of three emphases: (1) Language and Literature, (2) Greek and Roman Culture, or (3) Classical Archaeology. For each emphasis the student must begin the study of Greek and/or Latin, and take both general Classics courses and courses in his/her chosen area of emphasis.

Language and Literature

The Language and Literature emphasis focuses on examining the Graeco-Roman world through an exploration of ancient texts in their original languages. Like Classics as a field, this emphasis is strongly interdisciplinary. Reading in Greek and/or Latin texts offers the student a sampling of poetry, drama, history, philosophy, oratory, etc.

Students who wish to pursue graduate studies in Classics must take the Language and Literature emphasis, but this emphasis also serves well students with interdisciplinary interests who seek a challenging liberal arts major and who enjoy small classes in which they receive significant personal attention.

Degree Requirements
Preparation for the Major Units
Greek 1, 2, 3, 100, 101, or Latin 1, 2, 3, 100, 101 (or the equivalent): 8 – 23
Classics 20A or 40 and 20B: 8
History 2A or 4A: 4
Writing 109 HU: 4


NOTE:
Students completing courses in a second classical language may substitute up to 12 units of such work for Classics 37, 38, 40.

Upper-Division
36 UD units are required, distributed as follows:
Units
36
28 upper-division units selected from upper-division Greek or Latin not used in the preparation for the major. Up to 12 units of the 28 may be from upper-division Classics courses: 28
One course chosen from the following: Classics 150, 151;
History 111A-B-C-F-T, 112A-C-D
4
Classics 185 (or Classics 195A-B for Honors): 4

Greek & Roman Culture (Classical Civilization)

The emphasis in Greek & Roman Culture encourages students to pursue in-depth study of one of various clusters of interdisciplinary subjects pertaining to the Classical world: literary traditions and representations, politics and society, material culture and intellectual life. A breadth requirement in Comparative Ancient & Classical Cultures encourages cross-cultural comparison with pre-modern civilizations of Mesoamerica, the Middle East, or South or East Asia. A minimum of one year of Greek or Latin is required.

This emphasis is ideal for the student with interdisciplinary interests seeking a strong, liberal arts degree with a modern, global perspective on the Classical world.

Degree Requirements
Preparation for the Major Units
Classics 20A-B: 8
Writing 109 HU: 4


NOTE:
Greek and Roman Culture majors are also encouraged to use their General Education requirement to take related lower-division courses in Classics (36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 50), Comparative Literature (30A), Anthropology (2, 3), History of Art and Architecture (6A), History (2A or 4A), Philosophy (20A) and Religious Studies (80A).

Language requirement Units
Completion of Latin 3 or Greek 3. 0-15


NOTE:
Up to 12 upper-division units in Latin or Greek may be applied to the Upper-division major in category (a).

Upper-Division:areas of concentration
48 units, distributed as follows:
Units
48
A. 32 units in at least 2 areas, of which at least four courses must be Classics courses. (Note that upper-division courses commonly have prerequisites.)

  • Literary Traditions and Representations: Classics 102, 109, 110, 120, 130, 175
  • Politics and Society: Classics 140, 145, 150, 151; History 111A-B-C-F-T, 112A-C-D
  • Material Culture: Classics 155, 165, 170, 171; Art History 103A-B-C
  • Religious and Intellectual Life:Classics 101, 106; Philosophy 151, 152, 153, 156; Religious Studies 116A-B-C, 128A, 139A
32
B. One course in comparative ancient and classical cultures.
(Note that upper-division courses commonly have prerequisites.)

  • Cross-cultural: Anthropology 116A, 160, 164; Religious Studies 136
  • Ancient Near East: Anthropology 118TS, 138TS, 176TS; Religious Studies 115A, 128C, 129
  • Early Islam: History 145A; Religious Studies 149D
  • India: Religious Studies 160A, 162A, 162E
  • East Asia: Art History 134A-B; Chinese 148; Japanese 149; Religious Studies 166C, 167A; History 184A
  • The Americas:: Anthropology 150B-C, 175; Art History 130A-B-D; Chicana/o Studies 117
4
C. Three course in Classics

  • Classics 180A-B (8 units)
  • Classics 185 or 195A-B for Honors (4 units)
12

Classical Archaeology

The Classical Archaeology emphasis brings together classical art history, classical archaeology, anthropology, and ancient history into a coherent program of study. A minimum of five quarters of Greek or Latin is required.

This emphasis is for students with an interest in archaeology looking for a strong, liberal arts major, or for students planning to pursue graduate studies in Classical Archaeology.

Degree Requirements
Preparation for the Major Units
Greek 1, 2, 3 or Latin 1, 2, 3 (or the equivalent): 15
Classics 20A or 40, and 20B: 8
Classics 50 or Anthropology 3 or 3SS: 4 or 5
Art History 6A: 4
History 2A or 4A: 4
Writing 109 HU: 4

 

NOTE: Students completing courses in a second classical language may substitute up to 12 units of such work for Classics 37, 38, 40.

Upper-Division Major
36 UD units are required, distributed as follows:
Units
36
A. Anthropology 100 4
B. Three courses from: Classics 155, 165, 170; Art History 103A-B-C 12
C. Two courses from: Classics 101, 102, 106, 108, 109, 110, 130, 140, 175, 180A-B, or any upper-division Greek or Latin courses 8
D. Two courses from: Classics 145, 150, 151, 171; Art History 103A-B-C if not used in Area B); History 111A-B-C-F-T, 112A-C-D 8
E. Classics 185 (or Classics 195A-B for Honors) 4