Calendar

Apr
14
Fri
“Twenty-first century Classics and the Matter of ‘Black Lives’,” by Patrice Rankin @ HSSB 4080, UCSB
Apr 14 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

 Patrice Rankine is Dean of Arts and Sciences at Richmond University.

This lecture is part of the ‘Black Classicism’ lecture series presented in conjunction with the ‘14 Black Classicists‘ exhibition hosted jointly by the Museum of Art, Architecture and Design and the Library.

Co-sponsored by the Argyropoulos Endowment for Hellenic Studies, the Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, and the departments of Black Studies and Classics.

Apr
19
Wed
“Let us go upon the Acropolis: John Wesley Gilbert in Greece, September 1890-April 1891,” by John Lee (UCSB) @ UCSB Library, Instruction & Training 1312
Apr 19 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

John Wesley Gilbert (ca. 1865-1923) was born in Hephzibah, Georgia.  He received his BA from Brown University in 1888, and as a Brown MA student in 1890-1891 he became the first African American to attend the fledgling American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA).  Drawing on Gilbert’s own writings and other contemporary documents, this talk examines the historical significance of Gilbert’s year in Greece, including his participation in the ASCSA excavations at Eretria.
John W.I. Lee is Associate Professor of History at UCSB. This talk is part of the ‘Black Classicism’ lecture series presented in conjunction with the “14 Black Classicists” exhibition hosted by the AD&A Museum and the UCSB Library.Co-sponsored with the Argyropoulos Endowment in Hellenic Studies, the Art, Design & Architecture Museum, and the departments of Classics and Black Studies.
Apr
21
Fri
“Controlling women, founding the city: the role of Prokne in Aristophanes’ Birds”, by Deepti Menon @ HSSB 4065
Apr 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Apr
28
Fri
JP Sullivan Memorial Lecture: “The art of darkness: how the Romans invented night,” by Grant Parker @ HSSB 4080
Apr 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Night occupies an intriguing place in Roman culture: my aim will be to tease out some of its aspects. In particular, we may well ask about the role of night in relation to social boundaries, or how to make sense of its frequently negative representation in Latin literature. Were there changes in this over the course of historical time, particularly in late antiquity?

Grant Parker is Chair and Associate Professor of Classics at Stanford University.

May
19
Fri
Latin Sight Exam (Retake)
May 19 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

Contact Anna to schedule your time.

May
26
Fri
Greek Sight Exam (Retake)
May 26 @ 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Contact Anna to schedule your time.

Jun
2
Fri
Foreign Language Exam (Retake)
Jun 2 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

Contact Anna to schedule your time.