News

Temporary Part-Time Lecturer in the Classics Department

The Department of Classics invites applicants for possible openings as Temporary Part-Time Lecturer positions for the 2019-2020 academic year at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Appointments are variable in terms of percentage time and appointment may be from one quarter to a year, with the possibility of reappointment.

Areas of specialization: 
-Generalists
-Teaching Classics in translation
-Teaching ancient Greek at all levels
-Teaching Latin at all levels

Minimum Qualification: Ph.D. in Classics or related discipline (e.g. Comparative Literature with a specialization in Classics) is required at the time of application. The salary is based on UC’s salary scales. To ensure full consideration, please submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, syllabi for two upper division GE courses and arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent through UC Recruit https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/JPF01525 . The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through teaching, research, and service. For information on our department, please visit our website https://www.classics.ucsb.edu/ .

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

An interview with alumnus Vincent Shepherd (’17)

Vincent Shepherd (’17)

Vincent Shepherd graduated from UCSB in 2017 with a BA in Classics and History. He is currently a second-year law student at UC Irvine School of Law, where he serves as a staff editor for the UCI Law Review. Vincent has externed at the US Bankruptcy Court in Riverside and will be a Summer Associate at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner this summer. During a recent visit to campus, he reflected on how studying Classics has helped him succeed.

How did you decide to pursue a career in law?

I determined I wanted to go to law school during my sophomore year of undergrad. I was weighing career options at that time and I wanted to do something in which I could best apply my undergraduate majors in the professional world. Law school was the perfect option for me because it gave me the opportunity to apply many of the skills developed in undergrad towards a career with direct real-world impact.

What aspect of Classics was most helpful during the application process?

Studying Classics requires a lot of logical analysis and close reading. Latin in particular gave me some practice in detail-oriented analysis, which helped me on different portions of the LSAT.

And now that you’re in law school?

Studying Latin helped me develop the same skills used in legal analysis. When translating, you are asked analyze a passage and translate it according to the different grammatical rules. Likewise, when doing legal analysis, you have a set of rules which you are then asked to apply to a set of particular facts. Similar to how changing one letter in a sentence can yield a different translation, one minor change in a fact pattern can yield an entirely different conclusion. I think these analytical skills developed from studying Latin directly benefit me the most.

How often do you encounter Latin these days?

I might see Latin once or twice a week, depending on what classes I am taking. It helps to know what an antiquated legal doctrine translates to in order to understand what the law is, or how it got to what it is today.

What advice would you give to Classics majors who are planning to apply to law school?

Focus on your undergraduate studies and enjoy your Classics courses while you are in them. Grades are a large part of the application process. So, the more you engage in your studies, the better grades you will likely get, and the better you will likely do in the application process. The LSAT is the other major part of the application process, but you will have time to study that over summer, or when you are no longer in school if you take a gap year. Classics is a fun and interesting major. So, while you are in undergrad enjoy and engage in the material.

What advice would you give to Classics majors who are thinking about law school but aren’t quite sure?

If you are unsure whether being a lawyer is right for you, try a summer legal internship. This will give you some insights into what it’s like to be a lawyer and help you make that determination. Also, you do not need to rush into law school directly from undergrad. Many people take gap years before deciding to pursue a legal career. Take your time and think about if a legal career is right for you. However, as a Classics major, you are developing skills that will situate you for success in law school.

Vincent is available to mentor UCSB Classics majors who are interested in law school. Please e-mail Prof. Rose MacLean (maclean@classics.ucsb.edu) for more information.

Job Posting: Lecturer in Classics

The Department of Classics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, invites applications for a one-year, generalist part-time lecturer position for the 2018-2019 academic year. Responsibilities include teaching 5 undergraduate courses (two ancient Greek language courses, one larger lecture course, and two smaller lecture courses).

Minimum qualifications: a PhD in Classics or a comparable degree (including Comparative Literature/Classics). Preferred qualifications: 3-5 years of teaching courses using Greek and Latin texts in translation at the college level. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching, and service. For information on our department please visit our website: https://www.classics.ucsb.edu

To ensure full consideration, please submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a syllabus for a course on The Romans (a class of 130 students, to be taught using texts in translation, and with the support of a graduate student Reader), and arrange for three letters of reference. Documents should be submitted to UC Recruit at https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/apply/JPF01288

Letters of recommendation must be confidential. Please have your referees upload them directly through UC Recruit at https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/reference.

Apply by August 13th, 2018 for primary consideration. This position is open until filled. Inquiries about the position may be directed to Helen Morales, Chair of the Department of Classics at hmorales@classics.ucsb.edu

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

6 YEAR FUNDING FOR PHD STUDENT ABLE TO TEACH MODERN GREEK–Applications Due April 30 Copy

The University of California at Santa Barbara is delighted to offer a new funding opportunity: 6 years of full funding for a Classics PhD student who is able to teach modern Greek. The successful applicant will be expected to teach modern Greek to undergraduates for two quarters each year, and will be on fellowship for the third quarter (for five years; a 6th year will be funded by a fellowship year or teaching ancient languages or Greek myth). Summer funding is included. Greek-speaking applicants from Greece, the US, and other countries are encouraged to apply.

To learn more about the UCSB Classics department and PhD program: https://www.classics.ucsb.edu/

Who may apply?
Students who wish to pursue a PhD in Classics and who have a BA in Classics or a comparable degree and who have a minimum of 2 years training in both Latin and ancient Greek. Applicants must be a good fit for our department and bilingual in modern Greek and English. Applicants should have an aptitude for teaching, but no teaching experience is necessary as training will be given.

How to apply:

How to Apply

When to apply: 

By April 30th, but applications will be considered on a first come, first served basis.

For more information please contact the Chair of the Classics department, Professor Helen Morales: hmorales@classics.ucsb.edu

6 YEAR FUNDING FOR PHD STUDENT ABLE TO TEACH MODERN GREEK–Applications Due April 30

The University of California at Santa Barbara is delighted to offer a new funding opportunity: 6 years of full funding for a Classics PhD student who is able to teach modern Greek. The successful applicant will be expected to teach modern Greek to undergraduates for two quarters each year, and will be on fellowship for the third quarter (for five years; a 6th year will be funded by a fellowship year or teaching ancient languages or Greek myth). Summer funding is included. Greek-speaking applicants from Greece, the US, and other countries are encouraged to apply.

To learn more about the UCSB Classics department and PhD program: https://www.classics.ucsb.edu/

Who may apply?
Students who wish to pursue a PhD in Classics and who have a BA in Classics or a comparable degree and who have a minimum of 2 years training in both Latin and ancient Greek. Applicants must be a good fit for our department and bilingual in modern Greek and English. Applicants should have an aptitude for teaching, but no teaching experience is necessary as training will be given.

How to apply:

How to Apply

When to apply: 

By April 30th, but applications will be considered on a first come, first served basis.

For more information please contact the Chair of the Classics department, Professor Helen Morales: hmorales@classics.ucsb.edu